HHS Students Use iPad App to discover cell mitosis

After collaborating at a professional development earlier this year, biology teachers at HHS assisted their freshman students in creating digital mitosis flip books. In the past, students would have to draw pictures that vary slightly from each other and put them into a flip book to mimic the process of cell division. With the added technology of the Stop Motion Studio app available on the science department’s iPads, students were able to make yarn and clay come to life. This app creates movies in a similar way to how shows such “Wallace and Gromit” and “Gumby” were produced. Students started with a graphic organizer to assist them in planning out their video. Then, over a period of 2-3 days, students manipulated their materials to show the fluid process of cell division from the first cell in a period called Interphase to the final product of two daughter cells. In order to do this, they had to take anywhere from 30 to 300 pictures of their materials! The more pictures that were taken, the more realistic the animation appeared on the final product. After completing the recording on the app, students transferred their videos on to Google Drive and then iMovie, where they could edit their video and add music, title pages, and credits. The end result is that students had a much better understanding of how cell division occurs and they had a fun time creating these videos.

Miss Willwerth’s HHS students use a stop motion iPad app to show cell mitosis

After collaborating at a professional development earlier this year, biology teachers at HHS assisted their freshman students in creating digital mitosis flip books. In the past, students would have to draw pictures that vary slightly from each other and put them into a flip book to mimic the process of cell division. With the added technology of the Stop Motion Studio app available on the science department’s iPads, students were able to make yarn and clay come to life. This app creates movies in a similar way to how shows such “Wallace and Gromit” and “Gumby” were produced. Students started with a graphic organizer to assist them in planning out their video. Then, over a period of 2-3 days, students manipulated their materials to show the fluid process of cell division from the first cell in a period called Interphase to the final product of two daughter cells. In order to do this, they had to take anywhere from 30 to 300 pictures of their materials! The more pictures that were taken, the more realistic the animation appeared on the final product. After completing the recording on the app, students transferred their videos on to Google Drive and then iMovie, where they could edit their video and add music, title pages, and credits. The end result is that students had a much better understanding of how cell division occurs. They had a fun time creating these videos.